Zakhirati Zainol Abidin

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Posted On December 22, 2015By hadzantonisIn 2015-Dec-22, 2015-dec-22-mis

Antibiotics: Society’s resistance: Part 2

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Posted On September 16, 2015By hadzantonisIn 2015-sep-19, 2015-sep-19-mis

Family planning: Part 1

Dr. Zakhirati Binti Zainol Abidin currently works at Hospital Kuala Lumpur.Read More
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Posted On August 1, 2015By hadzantonisIn 2015-aug-18, 2015-aug-18-mis

Discussing death

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We catched up with Dr. Zakhirati Zainol Abidin and she talked about AIDS education and awareness in our society.Read More
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(How) Should infants be educated about death? In the April 2015 issue, I discussed difficulties in informing adults of a death of a loved one. But what about children or even infants? In June, 2013, nearing the end of a 24-hour shift in the Emergency ward, and hoping that the night was to continue peacefully, ambulance sirens suddenly filled the air. I and other medical personnel ran to the glass doors, only to see a stretcher emerging from an ambulance, sheets soaked in blood, and carrying a patient; a woman, in critical condition. The womanRead More
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Posted On May 10, 2015By hadzantonisIn 2015-may-15, 2015-may-15-mis, Education

Deconstructing the doctor

There exists an unspoken agreement between doctor and patient, motivated by the intimacy that becomes – the doctor role and the patient role. This relationship seldom transgresses. After years of working as a doctor, I realize that days come when seeing patients becomes overly routine, where, akin to office work, patients appear as stacks of paperwork waiting to be processed. As doctors, seldom do we consider patient views nor emotions about contracting sicknesses, nor how patient lives will alter, consequently. Doctors, even when fallen ill, will refuse to enact that sick role. Rather,Read More
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Posted On March 17, 2015By hadzantonisIn 2015-Mar-13, 2015-Mar-13-sm, Education, Psychology

Educated by death

Death, in its inevitability, does not render itself any more pleasant with experience. On the contrary, the event is riddled with heavy burden and emotional negativity, which we must deal with, frequently alone. While I was on call one night in the Emergency Department, in a district hospital in northern Malaysia, I was informed of an accident involving a motorbike and a van. A call from the ambulance at the scene informed us to standby for resuscitation. All three teenage girls, riding together on the small scooter, injured, were in veryRead More
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Hospitals in Malaysia have limited facilities. In a developed country such as Malaysia, one would expect adequate facilities for all; or at least basic functionality. In September 2014, Dr. A, a junior medical officer (JMO), recently completing his housemanship, and without guidance, as do many JMOs, was  thrown into a situation where he lost, but won. Following an overnight shift in a rural hospital in Pahang, parents admitted a 4-year-old boy. The boy, ill-looking, feverish, and having difficulty breathing, had an underlying disease called Prader-willi syndrome. The disease is a genetic disorder characterized byRead More
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